Like so many of your colleagues, you are looking for ways to “work smarter, not harder” as you design learning opportunities for a wide range of students with language development needs – including those who are designated as English Language Leaners (ELL’s).  You recognize that students are mastering academic content and language proficiencies at the same time.

You also understand that regardless of the context in which you teach – if you have even one ELL student in your care, then you are in essence a “Teacher of ELL’s.” This realization is a significant one and is emphasized in the English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPs) developed through an 11-state consortium. To learn whether this consortium includes your state, check out a map of participating states:  http://www.elpa21.org/standards-initiatives/ells-elpa21 .

Coming early 2015, one 15-hour course that teaches:

  • The difference between receptive, productive, and interactive modalities and what this means for instructional planning
  • How to interpret data around any ELL identified learner’s language proficiency levels and what educators can expect when designing effective instruction for a diverse language learning population
  • The difference between language function and form
  • How to answer this enduring question, “What might an ELL’s language use look like at each ELP level as he or she progresses toward independent participation in grade-appropriate activities?”

The 45-hour course will teach and guide you to successful implementation of the standards in your context to ensure that you have confidence in:

  • Planning for effective instruction and differentiation regardless of the language proficiency levels of students
  • Specific strategies for supporting all 3 modalities – receptive, productive, and interactive – in any lesson.
  • Tools for ensuring that instructional delivery reflects both language acquisition and content mastery regardless of content, context, or configuration of learners.
  • Strategies that yield evidence of impact for ELL’s as they develop proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and listening.
  • How to answer this enduring question, “What might an ELL’s language use look like at each ELP level as he or she progresses toward independent participation in grade-appropriate activities and, in particular, in academic conversations?”